Again after few weeks of cloudy nights, on the lastday on November I was able to shoot a DSOin the sky.

As Im pretty limited from my Balcony, it face south I decided to go with the Rosette Nebula

Image details:

No calibration frames.

300 Light frames of 90s each (7.5h)
Bortle 4.8 Sky
South of Switzerland 

My equipment for this picture:

📡 Skywatcher EQ6-R Mount
📷 ZWO ASI 533MC Camera
🔭 TS-Optics Refractor 60mm 360mm
🔭 TS-Optics reducer 0.8x
🔭 QHYCCD mini Guide Scope 130mm
📹 QHYCCD mini 5II Guide camera
💻 N.I.N.A & PHD2 Software during Acquiring
🖥  Pixinsight for Post Processing

From Wikipedia:The Rosette Nebula (also known as Caldwell 49) is an H II region located near one end of a giant molecular cloud in the Monoceros region of the Milky Way Galaxy. The open clusterNGC 2244 (Caldwell 50) is closely associated with the nebulosity, the stars of the cluster having been formed from the nebula's matter.The complex has the following New General Catalogue (NGC) designations:

  • NGC 2237 – Part of the nebulous region (Also used to denote whole nebula)
  • NGC 2238 – Part of the nebulous region
  • NGC 2239 – Part of the nebulous region (Discovered by John Herschel)
  • NGC 2244 – The open cluster within the nebula (Discovered by John Flamsteed in 1690)[citation needed]
  • NGC 2246 – Part of the nebulous region

The cluster and nebula lie at a distance of 5,000 light-years from Earth[3] and measure roughly 130 light years in diameter. The radiation from the young stars excites the atoms in the nebula, causing them to emit radiation themselves producing the emission nebula we see. The mass of the nebula is estimated to be around 10,000 solar masses.A survey of the nebula with the Chandra X-ray Observatory has revealed the presence of numerous new-born stars inside optical Rosette Nebula and studded within a dense molecular cloud. Altogether, approximately 2500 young stars lie in this star-forming complex, including the massive O-type stars HD 46223 and HD 46150, which are primarily responsible for blowing the ionized bubble.[4][5] Most of the ongoing star-formation activity is occurring in the dense molecular cloud to the south east of the bubble.[6]A diffuse X-ray glow is also seen between the stars in the bubble, which has been attributed to a super-hot plasma with temperatures ranging from 1 to 10 million K.[7] This is significantly hotter than the 10,000 K plasmas seen in HII regions, and is likely attributed to the shock-heated winds from the massive O-type stars.On April 16, 2019 the Oklahoma Legislature passed HB1292 making the Rosette Nebula as the official state astronomical object. Oklahoma Governor Kevin Stitt signed it into law April 22.

Dopo 3 mesi di pausa forzata, meteo poco favorevole, a volte altri impegni, ieri sera ho trovato la sera giusta per cimentarmi a catturare la luce proveniente dalla costellazione del Cefeo e in particolare la Nebulosa IC1396A o anche chiamata, Elephant's Trunk Nebula. Dista circa 2400 anni luce dalla Terra. 

La Nebulosa IC1396A "Elephant's Trunk Nebula" è una concentrazione di gas e polveri interstellari, all'interno della regione di gas ionizzato.

E' comunemente chiamata Elephant's Trunk Nebula a causa del suo aspetto alle lunghezze d'onda della luce visibile, dove c'è una zona scura con un bordo luminoso e sinuoso. Il bordo luminoso è la superficie della nube densa che viene illuminata e ionizzata da una stella molto luminosa e massiccia (HD 206267) che si trova proprio ad est di IC 1396A. 

Si pensa che IC1396A sia un sito di formazione stellare, contenente diverse stelle molto giovani (meno di 100.000 anni) che sono state scoperte in immagini a infrarossi nel 2003.

Due stelle più vecchie (ma ancora giovani, un paio di milioni di anni, per gli standard delle stelle, che vivono per miliardi di anni) sono presenti in una piccola cavità circolare nella testa del globulo. I venti provenienti da queste giovani stelle potrebbero aver svuotato la cavità.

L'azione combinata della luce della stella massiccia che ionizza e comprime il bordo della nube, e il vento delle giovani stelle che spostano il gas dal centro verso l'esterno portano ad una compressione molto elevata nella Elephant's Trunk Nebula. Questa pressione ha innescato l'attuale generazione di protostelle.

 

My Equipment for this Picture:
 
📡 Skywatcher EQ6-R Mount
📷 ZWO ASI 533MC Camera
🔭 TS-Optics Refractor 60mm 360mm
🔭 TS-Optics reducer 0.8x
🔭 QHYCCD mini Guide Scope 130mm
📹 QHYCCD mini 5II Guide camera
🔭 60mm/240mm Guide Scope
💻 N.I.N.A & PHD2 Software during Acquiring
🖥  Pixinsight & PS for Post Processing
 
Links:
 
Wehre to buy stuff:
 
Acquiring, Guiding ad PP Software:
 
Sky Charts:

 

Charles Messier observed this group of galaxies in 1773, while observing a comet; he described the Whirlpool Galaxy as a rather faint starless double nebula with a bright centre. First William Herschel and then his son John observed these galaxies, noting that in the central part around the nucleus there was a strange optical effect, similar to a ring surrounding the bright centre. Admiral Smith compared the primary to the planet Saturn, stating that it would have a similar shape if observed from a vertical position. Lord Rosse finally recognised very clearly the spiral structure of the primary galaxy and the obvious connection with the minor object to the north.

This is my second attempt on M51, and still Im not really happy, I collimated as best as i could, but there is still something which is not 100% correct let see in the next Galaxy season.

For now Ill let you see what I took in two night, I didn't used Dark, Flat for the PP in PI, I ll try lter to do it with them as see if it improve, not sure.

So to take this picture I used a 6" RC from TS-Optics at 1370mm FL, my ZWO ASI 533 Camera, on my EQ6-R Pro mount.

I took 200 ea. 60" Lights Frame the first Night, before the clouds came in view cry, and 50 ea. 180" the second night before the cloud came in..

Gain of the 533 is 101 and 70 off set.

 

I still have a lot to learn in general, but more on the collimation of this 6" RC, and at the same time the focusing was also a trick issue, I use an ZWO EAF connected together with the other equipment using N.I.N.A, I had several issue to get decent focus, I should re-check all the parameter, and loosing good valuable imaging time on that...but at the end is worth... 

The Sunflower 🌻 Galaxy (M63 or NGC 5055), is a spiral galaxy visible in the boreal constellation of the Hunting Dogs; it was discovered in 1779 by Pierre Méchain, a colleague and friend of Messier, who collaborated in drawing up the famous catalogue.
 
The Sunflower galaxy is a spiral of the type Sb or Sc, which shows an irregular spiral pattern; it apparently seems to form a physical group with the Pinwheel Galaxy, the Whirlpool Galaxy and many other minor galaxies; it could belong to the Group of M101 (subgroup of M51). The proper name Sunflower is due to the very large number of spiral segments surrounding the nucleus, well wrapped around it and pervaded by a large number of interstellar dust clouds; the total mass of the galaxy would be between 80 and 140 billion solar masses, with a diameter of 90000 light-years, that is similar to that of our Milky Way. Its distance is estimated at 37 million light years and it is moving away from us at a speed of 580 km/s.

In May 1971, a type Ia supernova was observed between its arms, reaching an apparent magnitude of 11.8.

I took 173 x Lights Frames of 180s each, in the Wägital region, took me 3 nights to reach ~9 hours of data.
I used N.I.N.A as acquiring software and PHD2 for guiding, two great pieces of free software...
Than I used Pixinsight to process all the calibration data, which is composed by the 173 Lights frames, 100 Dark frames, 50 Flats and 50 Dark flats.
Ok if you are not familiar with Astrophotography all those info probably make no sense for you...do not worry...😅😅👍👍
If you are interested in learning Astrophotography you can find a lot of information I YouTube or in the WWW...and of course on Paper book as well..😀😀
Still a big margin of improvement but I'm happy...with...
 
My Equipment:
 
📡 Skywatcher EQ6-R Mount
📷 ZWO ASI 533MC Camera
🔭 TS-Optics RC 6" F/9 Scope 1370mm
📹 ZWO ASI 120 mini Guide Camera
🔭 60mm/240mm Guide Scope
💻 N.I.N.A & PHD2 Software during Acquiring
🖥  Pixinsight & PS for Post Processing
 
Links:
 
Wehre to buy stuff:
 
Acquiring, Guiding ad PP Software:
 
Sky Charts:
 
 

Pierre Méchain, the discoverer of Messier 101, described it as a:

"nebula without star, very obscure and pretty large, 6' to 7' in diameter, between the left hand of Bootes and the tail of the great Bear. It is difficult to distinguish when one lits the [grating] wires."

 Imagine that the light, to travel acorss M101 it will take around 170'000 Years !!😲😲😲 and to reach us the Light needed around 20 milions years, at a speed of 300000m/s !

 I leave here the link of Wikipedia about more information about the M101so you can take a read...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pinwheel_Galaxy

I took this picture of the M101 on 04 May '21, in a pretty cold evening up in the mountain region of central part of Switzerland in the Wägitaler valley.

Its pretty dark up there probably a Bortle 4 Sky a really beautiful lake (DAM actually) is also there.

So I prepared my setup , before driving there I collimate my RC 6" Scope as vest I could, its not difficult but it is not so easy, you need to take really small adjustment steps between the Secondary mirror, the Primary mirror and the Focuser tilt plate.

To to that I use a Howie Glatter Laser collimation tool, ad Cheshire and a set of allen key and a lot of patience...

Anyway, Its Monday evening around 10PM, Im around 890 msl so is pretty cold even now in May, after the initial setup, polar Alignement and Focusing and Pointing to the object (M101) I' m ready, to take a bounch of picture of this nice DSO. Oh yea Tuesday I work...ronf...ronf 🤦‍♂️🤦‍♂️🤷‍♂️🤷‍♂️😴😴.

S I took around 40 Light Frame RGB with my ZWO 533 camera and the TS 6" at full Focal lenght of 1370mm, I'm waiting a reducer but not yet arrived, to improve the Focal Ratio from F9 to F6.75 (x 0.75 reducer) of course the FL will be reduced as well to 1027 mm, not bad at all.

This is my second DSO with this scope I'm pretty happy with the result. 

With such FL you need to be very precise in everything, Setup, Polar Alignment, Pointing, etc..et no room for error if not your pictures will be not good at all.

I use great software all open source, in particular NINA & PHD2 which are really great piece of Software, thanks to all the guys involved in the Dev. of such great utilities. 

For the Post I use Pixinsight, which I'm still learning it, It is not easy especially in the beginning, but after some time you will find it very nice software.

In this particular picture I had only 2,7 Hrs of integration so it is not the best picture ever of course, but slowly I'm improving.

 

 

 

 

 

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